Virgin Blue is Now Virgin Australia

>> Wednesday, May 4, 2011



MELBOURNE, May 4 (Bernama)-- Virgin Blue Holdings Ltd has launched the Virgin Australia brand, to eventually replace the existing three brands, as the airline aims to capture a larger slice of the business travel market.

Virgin Australia was launched in Sydney today by Sir Richard Branson and chief executive John Borghetti, with new colours, uniforms and services.

"We're planning to have the best domestic business class," Branson is reported by the Australian Associated Press as telling the launch at Sydney Airport.

"We will continue to offer competitive economy class fares," he added.

Virgin Blue is aiming to increase its share of the business market in Australia, currently dominated by Qantas Airways Ltd, to raise the yield on the flights it offers.

The airline needs to increase profitability, after saying in March that it would report a full-year loss because of rising fuel prices, the Christchurch earthquake and flooding and Cyclone Yasi in Queensland.

It is expected to report a full-year pre-tax loss of A$30 million to A$80 million.

Virgin Blue said it would spend A$30 million to A$35 million on rebranding, new uniforms and new services.

It will buy 12 to 14 new planes this year in the new all-white colour scheme with red trim.

Virgin Australia will replace the existing domestic Virgin Blue brand immediately and international brands V Australia and Pacific Blue, by year-end.

Branson said Virgin Australia would shake up the Australian travel market even more than when Virgin Blue was launched 10 years ago.

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After Uncertainty, a Moment of Triumph in the Situation Room: 'We've IDed Geronimo'


The people who gathered Sunday in the Situation Room know all about high-pressure situations. But this was something else. For 40 minutes, the President and his senior aides could do nothing but watch the video screens and listen to the operation and ensuing firefight on the other side of the world. At Barack Obama's orders, special operations teams were invading the airspace of a foreign country, targeting a compound with unknown occupants, and hoping to get out unscathed. The target was America's No. 1 enemy, Osama bin Laden. But no one knew for sure if he was even there.

The President sat stone-faced through much of the events. Several of his aides, however, were pacing. For long periods of time, nobody said a thing, as everyone waited for the next update. In the modern age, Presidents can experience their own military actions like a video game, except that they have no control over the events. They cannot, and would not, intervene to contact the commanders running the operation. So when word came that a helicopter had been grounded, a sign that the plan was already off course, the tension increased. (See pictures of Osama bin Laden's Pakistan hideout.)

Minutes later, more word came over the transom. "We've IDed Geronimo," said a disembodied voice, using the agreed-upon code name for America's most wanted enemy, Osama bin Laden. Word then came that Geronimo had been killed. Only when the last helicopter lifted off some minutes later did the President know that his forces had sustained no casualties. (See pictures of people celebrating Osama bin Laden's death.)

The decision to attack had been made days earlier by the President. He gathered his senior intelligence, military and diplomatic team together in the Situation Room on Thursday afternoon to hear his options. There were already concerns about operational security. At that point, hundreds of people had already been read into the potential whereabouts of bin Laden. Any leak would have ruined the entire mission.

The intelligence professionals said they did not know for sure that bin Laden was in the compound. The case was good, but circumstantial. The likelihood, officials told the President, was between 50% and 80%. No slam dunk. Obama went around the table asking everyone to state their opinion. He quizzed his staff about worst case scenarios - the possibility of civilian casualties, a hostage situation, a diplomatic blow-up with Pakistan, a downed helicopter. He was presented with three options: Wait to gather more intelligence, attack with targeted bombs from the air, or go in on the ground with troops. The room was divided about 50-50, said a person in the room. John Brennan, the President's senior counter-terrorism adviser, supported a ground strike, as did the operational people, including Leon Panetta at the CIA. Others called for more time. In the end, about half of the senior aides supported a helicopter assault. The other half said either wait, or strike from above. (See TIME's al-Qaeda covers.)

Obama left the meeting without signaling his intent. He wanted to sleep on it. At about 8:00 a.m. on Friday, just before he boarded a helicopter that would take him to tour tornado damage in Alabama, Obama called his senior aides into the Diplomatic Room. He told them his decision: A helicopter assault. At that point, the operation was taken out of his hands. He was trusting the fate of his presidency to luck. He was putting his presidency in the hands of history.

(See TIME's Full Coverage of Osama bin Laden's Death.)

View this article on Time.com

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